• Employees 'under pressure' to use personal mobile devices

    A large number of businesses now expect their staff to use personal mobile devices for work, even though few have a clear strategy for managing this

    A large number of businesses now expect their staff to use personal mobile devices for work, even though few have a clear strategy for managing this

    A large number of businesses now expect their staff to use personal mobile devices for work, even though few have a clear strategy for managing this

    • A growing number of employees feel under pressure to use their personally-owned mobile devices for business purposes, despite the frequent lack of a formal strategy for this technology.

      This is according to recent research by Syntonic, which found 87 per cent of employers rely on their staff using personal smartphones to access business apps. Meanwhile, almost half of employees who responded to the survey said they were required to use their own gadget at work, with 23 per cent saying they felt under pressure to use it outside the office.

      However, there appears to be a widespread lack of a coherent strategy for managing these bring your own device (BYOD) programmes, with frequent uncertainty about who needs to take responsibility.

      For instance, 45 per cent of chief executives believe it should be up to them to oversee a companywide BYOD policy, while 73 per cent of chief information officers and 51 per cent of chief financial officers say it falls under IT's jurisdiction.

      As more than three-quarters of employees (77 per cent) expect the use of personal smartphones at work to increase in the coming year, the study noted it is therefore past time for businesses to develop a clear strategy for this.

      Sinan Eren, vice-president of Avast Mobile Enterprise, told CIO.com that businesses typically approach BYOD from a hardware security perspective. However, he noted that instead of worrying about security on devices and peripherals, businesses should be focusing on securing the corporate data that resides on the devices.

      This means creating policies around what can and cannot be accessed or stored on a personal device, as well as how users view this when they are away from the office environment.

      "CIOs now know that it is about protecting the corporate data that is mobile, rather than worry about devices," Mr Eren said. "There are no enterprise perimeters anymore, therefore tracking and controlling mobile data wherever it resides is the new trend. It is about time we focus on what really matters."