• IT execs overestimate security of mobile apps

    The majority of IT executives incorrectly believe the mobile apps they use are secure, it has been stated

    The majority of IT executives incorrectly believe the mobile apps they use are secure, it has been stated

    The majority of IT executives incorrectly believe the mobile apps they use are secure, it has been stated

    • Many IT executives are overconfident about the security of their mobile working solutions and falsely believe the apps they use are safe from the risk of data breaches.

      A survey conducted earlier this year by Arxan Technologies revealed almost nine out of ten IT executives (87 per cent) felt that their mobile applications are adequately secure, as did 83 per cent of employees.

      This is despite the fact that 90 per cent of the most popular mobile apps examined by Arxan were found to have vulnerabilities that could potentially expose sensitive business data.

      Speaking to The Enterprisers Project, chief executive of the company Sam Rehman said many employees have developed a false sense of security when it comes to how they use mobile devices. For instance, there is a widespread assumption that if an app is downloaded from well-known stores such as Google Play or Apple's App Store, it will be secure.

      Mr Rehman added that the reality may be very different, as even some of the most commonly-used enterprise apps that are recommended by businesses may be vulnerable to attack.

      Therefore, he said it is vital for IT leaders to put in place clear guidelines and best practices to minimise the risks associated with accessing confidential data via mobile devices.

      This should include data protection practices such as the use of strong passwords, ensuring devices can lock automatically after periods of inactivity and requiring regular backups.

      Users also need to be educated about other risks when using smartphones or tablets. This includes the danger of having a gadget lost or stolen, as well as visual hacking, where sensitive information is displayed on a screen in a location where anyone could view it.

      This may be a particular risk when employees are accessing business application or emails away from the office, such as on their morning commute.

      To counter this, businesses may need to be more selective about which personnel are permitted to access corporate data remotely, and ensure they have both the training and tools they need to do so securely.