1. A chance for young innovators to shine
3M Electronics

 

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    A chance for young innovators to shine

    February 04, 2020
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    A chance for young innovators to shine

    A record number of teachers attended launch events for the 2020 3M Young Innovators Challenge competitions that are designed to inspire the next generation of original thinkers.

    A chance for young innovators to shine

    A record number of teachers attended launch events for the 2020 3M Young Innovators Challenge competitions that are designed to inspire the next generation of original thinkers.

    A chance for young innovators to shine

    A record number of teachers attended launch events for the 2020 3M Young Innovators Challenge competitions that are designed to inspire the next generation of original thinkers.

    • The 2020 competition is open to schools in Bracknell Forest and Wokingham and Leicestershire and South Nottinghamshire, catchment areas for 3M’s head office in Bracknell and the Charnwood Campus site in Loughborough.

      More than 70 teachers representing 50 primary and secondary schools attended the launch on Thursday 16 January that was held at both 3M locations simultaneously.

      The teachers heard from competition organisers and judges about the individual challenges set for 2020 and how they encourage pupils to develop an interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths STEM subjects. Schools new to the challenge were also able to network with previous participants and pick up some tips.

      Winning schools will receive £750 to spend on science or design and technology equipment, with individual prizes for participating students. 3M also funds entry into the CREST Award scheme, from the British Science Association, enabling young people to gain a valuable, nationally-recognised external accreditation.

      A team from The Roundhill Academy in Thurmaston, Leicestershire, won the Science Detectives Challenge in 2019. Science teacher, Bethany Davenport, said: “With the prize money we purchased a selection of new physics teaching equipment, including an infrared camera and a Leslie Cube for recording and measuring thermal radiation. The new kit is enhancing practical lessons for many of our students.”

      The competition was launched in Leicestershire in 2012 and in Bracknell in 2017. To date, more than 3,500 students have reached the judging stages.

      John Klee, North Europe Corporate Communications manager, said: “We were delighted to see so many new schools at the launch events and also welcome back some familiar faces.

      “From the feedback we receive each year, we know how highly teachers value the competition as a way of engaging and developing their students’ STEM learning, communication, teamworking and other skills.

      “What also makes this competition so popular is that the schools and 3M work closely together; students visit our sites to see and experience the facilities and meet the organisers and judges of the competition, most of whom are scientists and engineers. It’s very collaborative.”

      Josh Sivier is a Year 5 teacher at the Licenced Victuallers’ School in Ascot, Berkshire. Speaking at the Bracknell launch event, he said: “We have entered the challenge for the past two years and are looking forward to taking part again. We run the competition during our Design and Technology lessons so that as many children as possible can take part.

      “This year we will enter the Slo-Mo Marble Challenge. This fits very well with the school science curriculum as it covers topics such as friction and forces.”

      The annual competition has six challenges, including two new ones for 2020, all designed around STEM learning as well as problem-solving and teamwork skills.

      New to the Loughborough competition this year is the AeroTech Challenge where pupils are tasked to design an aircraft and a launching device to propel it forward over the greatest distance. The challenge was developed with Jennifer Glover, a Loughborough University PhD student with a Masters degree in Aeronautical Engineering. Jennifer also joins as a new judge.

      Also new for secondary schools this year is the DizTech Challenge, developed with the Royal National Institute of Blind People RNIB College in Loughborough. Students are asked to design a product to enhance play, sport or a hobby, or make performing an everyday task easier for a young person who has one or more physical disabilities.

      John adds: “Our judges can’t wait to see the 2020 entries; they get more innovative and creative each year. One of last year’s entries, a beautiful scale model of the Tokyo Tower, even found itself on display at the Embassy of Japan in London.”



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